My Top 5 Reasons To Try Karate

The benefits of karate are numerous. I am going to focus on my top 5.

1. Health Benefits – Karate is a total body workout. It promotes heart health through high-aerobic exercise and it uses every muscle group in the body helping to improve muscle tone, flexibility, balance and strength.

2.  Self-confidence – Progress in karate is measured with the belt ranking system. The confidence and satisfaction on a student’s face at the end of a karate test is amazing. In that moment the student realizes that she has completed 3- 6 months of practice and perfection of short-term goals. She has increased her confidence in the ability to not only reach goals but to have achieved another level of new physical skills.

3. Stress Relief – According to the Mayo Clinic, “exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being . . . and also has some direct stress-busting benefits.” And the doctors and Harvard Health agree:

“[Exercise] has a unique capacity to exhilarate and relax, to provide stimulation and calm, to counter depression and dissipate stress. It’s a common experience among endurance athletes and has been verified in clinical trials that have successfully used exercise to treat anxiety disorders and clinical depression. If athletes and patients can derive psychological benefits from exercise, so can you.”

And don’t stress about how to get exercise into your schedule. Joining a class like karate will help you set a fixed time for working out. And having goals each class will help you keep up your consistency.

4. Self-Defense – Learning karate is also learning self defense skills. Self defense requires anyone who is threatened or under attack to quickly assess a situation and react in the way that will keep them safest. Karate teaches you how to defend yourself physically as well as how to avoid physical confrontations in the first place.

5. Support System – A karate dojo is another family. It is easy to make friends when you have common goals, and work hard together to achieve them. It is even easier in a dojo because students of karate share their fighting spirit. They support one another during class, through tests, and even through trials and tribulations outside of the dojo.

And those are just 5 of the many many reasons to try a class today.

 

Why We Say “Osu!”

Everyone training at Saratoga Karate and likely in karate dojos around the world has heard it, symptoms used it, ask and perhaps asked, “what does it mean?” Martial Artists often use the sound “Osu” to express their attitude toward training and each other. In a lot of karate schools including the Tenkara dojo “Osu!” seems to mean everything and anything – including: “hello” “goodbye”, “yes” “okay”, “thank you”, “excuse me”, “do you understand?”, “I understand” “train harder” and “great job”.

So, did you ever wonder where this catch-all single syllable sound comes from? Well, there are two prevailing theories of why we say “Osu!”

osu-kanji“Osu!” is a combination of two different kanji (Japanese characters). The first kanji, “osu” is a verb meaning “to push” as in to push aside or overcome obstacles. The second kanji is another verb, “shinobu” meaning to “to endure/suffer” or “to hide”. It implies the concept of pain along with the idea of courage, in other words the spirit of perseverance.

Research indicates that the expression “Osu” first appeared in the Officers Academy of the Imperial Japanese Navy, in the early 20th century. Since karate was developed during a militaristic period in Japan’s history, it is not surprising that the use of the expression drifted from military use to martial arts.

The second theory put forward by Dr. Mizutani Osamu, a linguistics professor at the University of Nagoya via an experiment he conducted regarding greetings between people concluded that Osu is probably a contraction of the formal Japanese expression for good morning, “Ohaiyo gozaimasu” A less formal greeting would be “Ohaiyo” and a much less formal exchange between men, mainly young men particularly when engaged in athletic activities, might be to merely say “Osu”.

This is a good time for a brief lesson in the Japanese language. First of all, “Osu!” is a masculine word, associated with all types of athletic activities, not just the martial arts, and mostly used as an exchange between males. The term is generally not directed at women, unless they are participating in athletic activities and beyond those time you usually will not hear women using the term.Karate black belt class shouting "Osu!"

As for the pronunciation, while many Westerners will say oosss as if it rhymes with moose, the correction pronunciation is oh-ss with the “oh” sounding like the “o” in most. The u at the end is silent, although if you listen to a native Japanese speaker it is pronounced although it is virtually imperceptible to a Western ear.

So have fun shouting “Osu!” during your karate instruction. Remember to say “OSU!” loudly and respectfully when Shihan, Senseis and Sempais enter the dojo. Osu!!

Self- Defense is for Everyone

Many people believe that you have to be a master in one form of martial arts or another in order to protect yourself. This is simply not true. You should, pills however, prostate attend self defense seminars whenever possible, buy and choose a few techniques that you know and will continue practicing. That is the key!

Being able to protectself defense seminar yourself in all situations is a confidence booster as much as a reassurance. When people think about self defense, they tend to think about self defense classes for women and children. Although many classes focus on women and girls, self defense is for everyone. It is important for everyone to learn to be more aware of surroundings, develop reflexes, and raise confidence.

First of all, a self defense class will help you understand why you should be so aware of your surroundings. While you’re not planning to be attacked, your attacker is planning. Once you understand this, you will start to become more alert.

Secondly, you will start developing your reflexes to help you respond better. Practice will help you develop a fighter’s reflex and allow you to move quickly and smartly in a bad situation. You might be shocked for a second, but – with practice – you will have the necessary reactions to protect yourself. Practice the self defense techniques as often as you can so they become second nature. You may ask which techniques are best. The simple ones are! You don’t need to learn any movie stunts, backspin kicks or high kicks to the head that require extra flexibility and years of fine-tuning.

Discerning the parts of the body that can easily be used as weapons are the techniques that work the best aself defense movesnd also happen to be the easiest to remember. Those body parts include the palm of the hand, back of the fist, elbow, knees, fingertips, and instep. Learning and practicing how to use these parts of your anatomy can be the difference between fighting off an attacker successfully and being unable to do so.

Finally, one of the biggest advantages to taking a self defense class is the way it makes you feel afterwards. Self defense classes will help you build confidence in yourself, offer a positive impact on your life, boost your state of mind and make you more confident.

Health Benefits of Karate

The health benefits of karate are consistent with most exercise with some very fun differences. For example, generic you get to yell really loudly in karate. You also exercise with other people. You make life-long friends, and you have the built-in goal of testing for higher belts or ranks.  And amidst all the fun are some serious health benefits such as the following.

Heart Health

I am not the official resource on heart health, but I think we can agree that the American Heart Association (AHA) is. Their recommendation includes:

 “All healthy adults get at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most – preferably all – days. All healthy adults (ages 18 to 65) should avoid inactivity and get at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity at least five days a week, OR at least 25 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity at least three days a week, for a total of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity.”

So, in other words, get moving! But if you find running too boring and walking too slow and you are unmotivated by exercise machines, then it may be time for you to try karate. It is definitely not boring, it certainly is not slow, and motivation comes in many forms including learning new material, learning new Japanese terminology, and of course there is testing for a new rank.

Sleep Health

What is “sleep health?” Well, as the National Sleep Foundation explains, it may not be easily defined as it is a relatively new field of research “exploring how we sleep and the factors that impact it.” However, we do know that sleep is important to humans and a few of the benefits include the following:

  • Cerebral spinal fluid that is pumped through the brain during sleep whisks away any waste products made by brain cells.
  • The heart is relieved of its awake-time work load thereby reducing heart rate as well as blood pressure.
  • During sleep, your body releases growth hormones that work to rebuild muscles and joints.

A study published in the December issue of the Journal Mental Health and Physical Activity found that people sleep significantly better and feel more alert during the day if they get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week. That is a mere 2.5 hours a week or 2 and a half Saratoga Karate classes.

Weight Loss

Practicing karate for an hour burns significant calories. Various calories burned charts will differ, however, dependent on your weight, the calories burned through karate can significantly supplement your weight loss efforts:

Weight 130lbs 155lbs 180lbs 205lbs
Calories Burned in Karate 420 570 720 870

To lose one pound within a week you have to burn or cut out about 3,500 calories from your diet. So you can delete about 500 calories a day or you could take a couple of karate classes during the week and not have to eliminate as much food.

 Stronger Immune System

Healthy-living strategies that include exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight increase the function of your immune system. Harvard Health agrees:

“Exercise can contribute to general good health and therefore to a healthy immune system. It may contribute even more directly by promoting good circulation, which allows the cells and substances of the immune system to move through the body freely and do their job efficiently.”

And when your immune system is working well, it can help you avoid illness. So, as most of the country heads into cold and flu season finding ways to strengthen your immune system is important.

Karate has so many benefits. Getting healthy and staying healthy are a couple of the best reasons to try a class today.

 

 

 

 

The Origins of “Tenkara”

The name Tenkara, decease which means “point of origin, view ” was chosen because I wanted the dojo to be grounded in the roots of traditional Japanese karate, as taught by the masters such as Ginchin Funakoshi.
Funakoshi Gichin

I recommend reading his book, Karate-do: My Way of Life, to get a more complete understanding of the roots of traditional Japanese karate. He not only explains the origins of the use of the “empty hand,” he emphasizes important points such as:

  • You must be serious in training
  • Train with both hearth and soul
  • Avoid self-conceit and dogmatism
  • Try to see yourself as you truly are
  • Abide by the rules of ethics in your daily life, whether in public or private

This is why training in Tenkara is hard, but also based on love, compassion, understanding and respect.  Through this teaching, the Tenkara student is well-rounded in his or her approach to martial arts and self-defense. Additionally, outside the dojo, the student strives to help humankind and the world in which we live.

Tenkara endeavors to develop Karateka (karate students) of strong moral character as well as reinforce positive values which will transcend the dojo walls into everyday life; just as Master Funakoshi meant for karate to be practiced.

Karate is one of the most refined of the martial arts and it is for everyone. As Master Funakoshi wrote:

“One of the most striking features of karate is that it may be engaged in by anybody, young or old, strong or weak, male or female . . . someone whose desire is merely to stay healthy and to train his mind and spirit may do so by practicing karate…”

lenaThis is why in Tenkara, students are the same, regardless of perceived differences. It is indeed a dojo for everyone “whose desire is merely to stay healthy and to train his mind and spirit.”

The strength of the school is determined by the dedication of our individual members. And I thank the dedication of each and every member.

To learn more about Tenkara visit SaratogaKarate.com